Established in 2012, this statewide, juried exhibition promotes the contemporary art practices in the state of Louisiana, provides an exhibition space for the exposition of living artists’ work and engages a contemporary audience that recognizes the vibrant visual arts culture of Louisiana and the role of New Orleans as a rising international art center.
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Selections from the Permanent Collection of the Ogden Museum are currently installed on the third and fourth floor of Goldring Hall. Ranging from 19th century Bayou School landscapes to Vernacular Art, these exhibitions celebrate the depth and breadth of the Museum’s holdings.
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Memory is a Strange Bell: The Art of William Christenberry draws inspiration from a line of Emily Dickinson – often quoted by Mr. Christenberry – to explore the role of remembrance and the passage of time in the artist’s work. Although widely known as a pioneering master of color photography as an art form, Christenberry was a multifaceted artist – utilizing painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, found object assemblage, and installations to weave a deeply personal narrative with universal relevance.
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In 2015, Level Artist Collective was formed by Ana Hernandez, Horton Humble, Rontherin Ratliff, John Isiah Walton and Carl Joe Williams. As five artists of color with deep ties to the city of New Orleans, Level Artist Collective developed with the intent of creating a platform to promote, support and sustain their cooperative voice and vision. Together, their concerted impact on the visual landscape of the American South and beyond is stronger because of their unique yet complimentary force. Together, they are presenting a distinctly New Orleans narrative to the larger contemporary art dialogue through fiercely independent studio practices.
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Mario Petrirena was born in 1953 in Cuba. In 1962, when he was eight years old, Petrirena was sent to the United States as part of Operation Pedro Pan. He lived for months in a Colorado orphanage before his parents and other siblings arrived in the U.S. The traumatic experience of separation from his family and of being a political refugee – combined with the reality of his bifurcated identity as both Cuban and American – has informed much of his art practice.
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The Ogden Museum is proud to present an exhibition of the works of American Abstract Expressionist artist, Dusti Bongé. This exhibition brings together works from throughout her career to tell the story of one woman’s fierce dedication to a creative life, culminating in a body of work that stands testament to her strong contribution to American Art after World War II.
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Courtney Egan is strongly inspired by the profusion of native and non-native flora in New Orleans, where she has lived and worked in since 1991. Her work is known to digitally manipulate the natural world, questioning how our perception of nature is augmented by technology.
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